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How to Keep Fresh Coriander Leaves Fresh For Longer

Category : cooking , 2 years ago

Coriander leaves The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, or (in North America) cilantro. It should not be confused with culantro, an apiaceae like coriander (Coriandrum sativum) but in a different genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a much more potent volatile leaf oil and a stronger smell. The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with citrus overtones. However, some people experience an unpleasant soapy taste or a rank smell and avoid the leaves. The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian foods (such as chutneys and salads); in Chinese and Thai dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamole and as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other CIS countries. Chopped coriander leaves are a garnish on Indian dishes such as dal. As heat diminishes their flavour, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavour diminishes. The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking. Coriander is common in South Asian, Southeast Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Caucasian,Central Asian, Mediterranean, Tex-Mex, Latin American, Brazilian, Portuguese, Chinese, African, and Scandinavian cuisine. Coriander, like many spices, contains phytochemicals which may delay or prevent the spoilage of food seasoned with this spice.
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